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About this Publication
Title
Sexually transmissible infections and prostate cancer risk.
Pubmed ID
18768506 (View this publication on the PubMed website)
Digital Object Identifier
Publication
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep; Volume 17 (Issue 9): Pages 2374-81
Authors

Huang WY, Hayes R, Pfeiffer R, Viscidi RP, Lee FK, Wang YF, Reding D, Whitby D, Papp JR, Rabkin CS

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmissible infections (STI) have been variably associated with increased risks of prostate cancer, largely in case-control studies.

METHODS: In the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we examined risk of prostate cancer in relation to serum antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis, human papillomavirus-16 and -18, herpes simplex virus-2, cytomegalovirus, and human herpesvirus-8 in 868 cases (765 Whites and 103 Blacks) and 1,283 controls matched by race, age, time since initial screening, and year of blood draw; all blood samples were collected at least 1 year before prostate cancer diagnosis, except for 43 Black cases. We also assessed risk associated with self-reported history of syphilis and gonorrhea.

RESULTS: Prevalences of the 7 STIs among controls were weakly correlated, and all were more frequent among Blacks than Whites, except for human herpesvirus-8. Among Whites, prostate cancer risk was not significantly associated with the individual infections or with their number (P(trend) = 0.1); however, men with one or more STI had slightly higher risk (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.6). Among Blacks, excess risk was associated with IgA antibody to C. trachomatis (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.6).

CONCLUSION: This large prospective study of prostate cancer shows no consistent association with specific STIs and a borderline association with any versus none. Whether a shared response or correlated infection not directly measured underlies the weak association requires further study.

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