Skip to Main Content

COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

What people with cancer should know: https://www.cancer.gov/coronavirus

Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://covid19.nih.gov/

Principal Investigator
Name
Natasa Tasevska
Institution
NCI, DCEG, NEB
About this CDAS Project
Study
PLCO (Learn more about this study)
Project ID
2008-0023
Initial CDAS Request Approval
Sep 26, 2008
Title
Meat, meat cooking methods and meat mutagens, and lung cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO)
Summary
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide [1]. An international panel of experts concluded that there is ‘limited – suggestive’ evidence that red and processed meat are related to increased risk of lung cancer and more research in the area is needed [1]. The possible mechanisms may be the fat content of meat, mutagens found in meat due to high temperature cooking [2,3,4,5] or preserving [6,7], as well as endogenous formation of mutagens from heme present in meat [8]. So far, no cohort and only few case-control studies [9,10], have investigated the risk of lung cancer associated with different forms of meat cooking and preservation. We propose a detailed investigation of the association between lung cancer and consumption of meat in participants enrolled in the screened arm of the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial (N = 60,266; lung cancer cases ~ 1000). The PLCO used an extended version of Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) querying detailed information on the meat type, cooking methods and doneness level, which will enable us to study the effect of different types of meat, cooking methods, and the intake of associated meat mutagens, as well as heme iron. PLCO has also comprehensive smoking information, which will allow appropriate adjustment for this powerful confounder.
Aims

1) To investigate the association between red and processed meat intake, meat by cooking methods and meat mutagens, and risk of lung cancer;
2) To investigate the association between heme iron and total iron in diet, and risk of lung cancer;
3) To investigate whether the association between red and processed meat intake, meat by cooking methods, meat mutagens and heme iron, and risk of lung cancer differ by histological type;
4) To investigate whether there is an interaction between smoking status and meat, meat mutagens or heme iron intake in relation to lung cancer risk;

Hypothesis 1: Red and processed meat, meat cooked at high temperatures, well-done meat, meat mutagens and heme iron are positively associated with risk for lung cancer.

Hypothesis 2: Total energy and saturated fat are positively associated with risk for lung cancer, but they do not attenuate the risk associated with red and processed meat intake and associated mutagens in a multivariate model.”

Hypothesis 3: The association between red and processed meat, meat cooked at high temperatures, well-done meat, meat mutagens and heme iron, and the risk for lung cancer does not change by smoking status or histological type of lung cancer.

Collaborators

Neil Caporaso (GEB/DCEG/NCI)
Amanda Cross (NEB/DCEG/NCI)
Rashmi Sinha (NEB/DCEG/NCI)
Nataša Tasevska (NEB/DCEG/NCI)

Related Publications