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Principal Investigator
Name
Chuanbo Xie
Degrees
M.D., Ph.D.
Institution
Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center
Position Title
Research Associate
Email
About this CDAS Project
Study
PLCO (Learn more about this study)
Project ID
PLCO-249
Initial CDAS Request Approval
Jan 31, 2017
Title
Physical activity and reproductive characteristics in the development of postmenopausal breast cancer
Summary
Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases among women in both developed and developing countries. According to the 2012 Globocan report, approximately 1.7 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year and accounts for 25% of all cancers in women. Previous studies consistently suggested that reproductive factors such as advanced age at first menopause and pregnancy, abortion, and oral contraceptive use were associated with elevated risk of breast cancer. However, few studies have examined whether any factors that can modify the associations between the reproductive factors and breast cancer exists. Physical activity, which is a well-established protective factor for breast cancer, might be a good potential effect modifier. In this study, we aim to examine whether physical activity can modify the association between certain reproductive factors and postmenopausal breast cancer using the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) study dataset. The study has implications in guiding women with poor reproductive history to choose appropriate lifestyles to reduce their postmenopausal cancer risk.
Aims

(1) To determine whether advanced age at menopausal and pregnancy, abortion, and oral contraceptive use are associated with postmenopausal breast cancer.
(2) To examine whether physical activity can modify the associations between the above mentioned reproductive factors and postmenopausal breast cancer.

Collaborators

Kelly Yu, PhD, MPH; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892

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